Ranking All The Pointer Sisters Studio Albums

Pointer Sisters

From West Oakland, California, the Pointer Sisters, along with their brothers, had been encouraged to listen to and perform gospel music by their parents, Reverend Elton Pointer and Sarah Pointer. They were taught as children music revolving around blues and rock and roll was devil’s music, but each time the parents were away, those were the genres the siblings would listen to and sing. Over time, as the sisters grew into young women, their love to perform music grew. When June Pointer, the youngest sister, brought an old Elvis Presley record and was allowed to play it, it seemed at least the mother was beginning to loosen up in regards to music outside the gospel genre. After the sisters graduated from high school, the older sisters, Ruth, Anita, and Bonnie each married and had children. June, however, was determined to engage in a music recording career. One by one, the rest of the sisters teamed up with June that would ultimately create one of the most popular all-female groups during the 1970s, The Pointer Sisters.

The Pointer Sisters Discography

The Pointer Sisters officially began their singing career in 1970 and released their first studio album in 1973. Altogether, a total of fifteen studio albums have been recorded and released, as well as eleven compilation albums, three live albums, and a soundtrack. The group also has fifty-one singles to their credit. In 2005, The Pointer Sisters were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame. As a band, The Pointer Sisters still continue, but Ruth is the only member of the original lineup. With her in the current lineup is her daughter, Issa, and her granddaughter, Sadako.

15. Only Sisters Can Do That

 

The final studio album recorded by The Pointer Sisters was (Only Sisters Can Do That), which was released in 1993. There was a single it produced, (Don’t Walk Away), but it failed to make an impression on any music charts. Despite the critical accolades, the fans didn’t seem interested enough to buy the album, which ultimately made it a commercial disappointment compared to the previous albums the sisters had released.

14. Right Rhythm

 

The one and only album recorded with the Motown label was (Right Rhythm). It was the fourteenth studio recording by The Pointer Sisters. Whatever magic the sisters hoped to achieve to recharge their career did not happen in 1990 as they had hoped. The first of the three singles is produced was (Friends’ Advice (Don’t Take It)), which charted at number thirty-six on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart and at number ninety-seven on the UK Singles Chart. The second single, (After You), failed to chart while the third single, (Insanity), peaked as high as number eleven on the US Billboard Dance Club Songs chart and at number sixty-two on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart.

13. Serious Slammin’

 

(Serious Slammin’) was the thirteenth studio album recorded by The Pointer Sisters and the final with the label, RCA Records. Released in 1988 it produced two singles, both of which earned moderate chart success. (He Turned Me Out) peaked at number thirty-seven on the US Billboard Dance Club Songs chart and at number thirty-nine on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. (I’m in Love) peaked at number thirty-seven on the US Billboard Adult Contemporary chart and at number sixty-seven on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. This was the final time the sisters worked with longtime producer, Richard Perry.

12. Priority

 

In 1979, (Priority) became The Pointer Sisters’ sixth studio album, and saw two singles released. (Blind Faith) and (Who Do You Love) didn’t quite crack into the US Billboard Hot 100. Overall, the album received mixed reviews as it seemed the second album venture with Richard Perry, as well as the rock genre. Whatever worked on the previous album didn’t quite cut it as well in the second. However, the sisters made up for it as they continued to evolve with their style of music that turned them into the superstars they are.

11. So Excited!

 

Three singles came from the album, (So Excited!) when it was released in 1982. It was the ninth studio album The Pointer Sisters, which met with a bit of controversy due to the third single it released, (See How the Love Goes) as apparently the subject matter at the time was too questionable to put on the air. As for the first single, (American Music), it was a number nine hit on the US Billboard Adult Contemporary, a number sixteen hit on the US Billboard Hot 100, and a number twenty-three hit on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. The second single, (I’m So Excited), was most successful on the Australian ARIA singles chart at number nine and at number eighteen on The Dutch Top 100 in the Netherlands. On the US Billboard Hot 100, I’m So Excited charted as high as number thirty and it was a number twenty-eight hit on the US Billboard Dance Club Songs chart. (If You Wanna Get Back Your Lady) was another hit for the album, which was a moderate success that peaked as high as number twenty-three in the Netherlands, at number forty-eight on the US Dance Club Songs chart, and at number sixty-seven on the US Billboard Hot 100.

10. Special Things

 

In 1980, (Special Things) was released as the seventh studio album for The Pointer Sisters. It received positive reviews from the music critics and produced four singles, starting with the hit, (He’s So Shy). The Recorded Music New Zealand (RMNZ) charted the single at number one and it was a number three hit on the US Billboard Hot 100. It also became a certified gold seller, according to the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). On the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, it peaked at number ten. (Could I Be Dreaming) was the second single from the album to chart, which climbed as high as number twenty-two on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart and at number fifty-two on the US Billboard Hot 100. (We’ve Got the Power) and (Where Did the Time Go) were the third and fourth singles released from Special Things, but neither earned any chart success.

9. Having a Party

 

1977’s (Having a Party) was the fourth studio album recorded by The Pointer Sisters, which was the final album they released through the record label, Blue Thumb. This served as the final album that featured Bonnie Pointer as a member of the group, and it was also an album that saw the youngest sister, June, out for a brief period of time. There were two singles released from the album that saw its title track charted at number sixty-two on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. The second single, (I Need a Man) didn’t earn any chart success.

8. Hot Together

 

The twelfth studio album recorded by The Pointer Sisters was (Hot Together) and it was released in 1986 by RCA Records. There were four singles released from the album that saw the first two, (Goldmine) and (Sexual Power) peak at their best at number seven on the US Billboard Dance Club Songs chart. It served as the final time The Pointer Sisters would have a top ten hit on any music chart. The third single, (All I Know Is the Way I Feel), peaked as high as number thirty-six on the US Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, and the fourth single, (Mercury Rising), appeared on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart.

7. Steppin’

 

The Pointer Sisters released their third studio album, (Steppin’), in 1975 through the Blue Thumb record label. Unlike the first two albums, it did not earn any RIAA certifications, despite the fact that it had featured the first number one hit the ladies earned in their career. (How Long (Betcha’ Got a Chick on the Side)) topped the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart and was a number twenty hit on the US Billboard Hot 100. In Canada, the single peaked as high as number thirty-one. (Going Down Slowly) was the second hit single released from Steppin’, which was a number sixteen hit on the US Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, a number sixty-one hit on the US Billboard Hot 100, and a number seventy-one hit on RPM Canada’s Single Chart.

6. That’s a Plenty

 

The second studio album recorded by The Pointer Sisters was released in 1974 through Blue Thumb records and the second to earn a gold certification by the RIAA. (Steam Heat) and (Fairytale) were the two singles released from the album. The first of the two received moderate chart success in Canada at number ninety, but it was the second of the two that faired much better. It was a number thirteen hit on the US Billboard Hot 100 and on the US Billboard Adult Contemporary chart. The single peaked at number thirty on Australia’s ARIA chart and at number forty-two on RPM Canada’s Official Singles Chart.

5. The Pointer Sisters

 

In 1973, through the independent label of Blue Thumb, The Pointer Sisters record and release their self-titled debut album. During its debut week, it became the third best-selling album on the US Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart and had since become certified gold by the RIAA. There were two hit singles that came from the album that served as an official hello to music fans that wasted no time winning them over. (Yes We Can) became a number eleven hit on the US Billboard Hot 100 and a number twelve hit on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. It also served as an international hit by charting at number thirty-three in Canada, number twenty-five on the Dutch Single Top 100 Chart, and at number eighty-six on Australia’s ARIA chart. The second single, (Wang Dang Doodle), peaked at number twenty-four on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart and at number sixty-one on the US Billboard Hot 100.

4. Black & White

 

In 1981, The Pointer Sisters released their eighth studio album, (Black & White), which later became certified gold by the RIAA. It was also nominated for a Grammy Award in 1982 for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, but that win went to The Dude by Quincy Jones. The album produced four singles where three of them earned chart success on the billboards. The first was the mega-hit, (Slow Hand), which has remained as one of the group’s best-selling singles of all time. The song itself earned RIAA’s gold certification, as well as a number two chart rank on the US Billboard Hot 100 and on the Irish Singles Chart. (What a Surprise) charted at number fifty-two on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs Chart, and was followed by (Sweet Lover Man), which did not find any chart success. The fourth single was (Should I Do It), which peaked as high as number thirteen on the US Billboard Hot 100 and was also an internationally charting success. It, however, didn’t match the success level Slow Hand did.

3. Energy

 

Released in 1978, (Energy) was The Pointer Sisters’ fifth studio album and the first through the record label, Planet, and without their sister, Bonnie. It was the best-selling album in the Netherlands as it debuted at number one and became platinum-certified by its Nederlandse Vereniging van Producenten en Importeurs van beeld – en geluidsdragers (NVPI). In Canada, The Pointer Sisters quickly became enormously popular and also saw this album become platinum with its nation’s music recognition industry. In the US, it served as the third time The Pointer Sisters would earn the RIAA gold certification. There were three singles that came from the album, starting with the RIAA-gold-certified (Fire). In the Netherlands and New Zealand, it became a number one hit and officially earned The Pointer Sisters a solid name for themselves in those two nations. Fire was a number two hit on the US Billboard Hot 100, which marked the first time the ladies broke into the top ten on its chart. In Canada, it was a number three hit and it was a number seven hit in Australia. Fire also served as an introduction between The Pointer Sisters and the UK Singles Chart as it peaked at number thirty-four there. (Everybody Is a Star) served as the second hit for The Pointer Sisters in the UK as the song charted at number sixty-one. (Happiness), as the third single from Energy, charted as high as number eleven in the Netherlands and at number eighteen on the US Billboard Dance Club Songs chart. It was the first time The Pointer Sisters had their music chart with the dance club scene.

2. Contact

 

(Contact) was the eleventh studio album recorded by The Pointer Sisters and was released in 1985 by RCA Records. It was the first of three studio albums the sisters officially recorded with the label since its acquisition of their original label, Planet. It was also among the most successful. Both Music Canada and the RIAA certified it platinum, thanks to the biggest single, (Dare Me). As the first of four songs released from the album, Dare Me charted as high as number six on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart and at number eleven on the US Billboard Hot 100. It was a number one hit on the US Billboard Dance Club Songs chart, which was the first and only occasion The Pointer Sisters would reach the top there. Dare Me was internationally successful, charting within the top twenty among most of the official music charts. (Freedom) was the second single, which peaked as high as number sixteen on the US Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, at number twenty-five on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, and at number fifty-nine on the US Billboard Hot 100. The third hit single was (Twist My Arm), which was popular enough on the US Billboard Dance Club Songs chart to peak as high as number fifteen. The fourth single, (Back in My Arms) failed to chart. However, Contact, as an album, was nominated by the Grammy Awards for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal in 1986, but the big win went to the Commodores and their album, Nightshift.

1. Break Out

 

(Break Out) was the tenth studio album recorded by The Pointer Sisters, as well as the final time they’d be still under the Planet record label before RCA Records took it over. It was the most successful album the sisters ever produced as it became a multi-platinum phenom. It was triple-platinum with RIAA and quadruple platinum with Music Canada. The British Phonographic Industry (BPI) and Recorded Music New Zealand (RMNZ) both certified Break Out as gold. The first single from the album was (I Need You), which earned a number thirteen hit on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Ho Songs chart and a number fifteen hit on the US Billboard Adult Contemporary chart. On the US Billboard Hot 100, Break Out peaked at number forty-eight. On the Irish Singles Chart, it climbed as high as number twelve and it climbed as high as number twenty-five on the UK Singles Chart. As for the second single, (Automatic), it became a chart-topper on the Irish Singles Chart and peaked as high as number two on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart and the UK Singles Chart where it also became BPI-certified silver. On the US Billboard Hot 100, it peaked at number five. At the 1985 Grammy Awards, it won the category of Best Vocal Arrangement for Two or More Voices. (Jump (For My Love)) was the third single released from Break Out and was the second 1985 Grammy Award winner, this time for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal. Music Canada certified the single as gold not long after it peaked its music chart at number eight. On the US Billboard Hot 100, the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, and New Zealand’s singles chart, Jump charted as high as number three. The remix of (I’m So Excited) earned a silver certification from BPI after its popularity reached number eleven on the UK Singles Chart in 1984. On the US Billboard Hot 100, it charted as high as number nine. (Neutron Dance) was the fourth single released from the album and topped the Canadian music chart, as well as becoming certified gold. It was very popular on the US Billboard Dance Club Songs chart and in Australia as Neutron Dance peaked as high as number four on their charts. On the US Billboard Hot 100, it climbed as high as number six. The fifth and final single from the album was (Baby Come and Get It), which was a number eight hit on the US Billboard Dance Club Songs chart and peaked as high as number twenty-four on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart.

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