The 10 Best Fats Domino Songs of All-Time

Fats Domino

The ’50s and ’60s were indeed Fats Domino’s heyday. The legendary piano player was the biggest star of New Orleans R&B, releasing an astonishing 16 Top 10 hits between 1955 and 1963. But one could argue that most of his best songs came before the Beatles invaded America. Still, they remain classics to this day. So in tribute to the late great Fats Domino, here are my Top 10 Fats Domino songs of all time.

10. Blue Monday [1957]

 

Blue Monday is the second song by Fats Domino to hit number one on the R&B chart. The single also went to number two on the pop chart. It was written and recorded in New Orleans by Domino, Dave Bartholomew, and Pearl King in March 1957. In its original form, Blue Monday is credited to Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. The two musicians wrote it after they took LSD together, which inspired Domino so much that he claimed that for three days after taking the drug, when someone spoke to him, “it sounded like they were talking in a deep cave.” Domino claimed in an interview with Dave Marsh that he was high on LSD when he wrote the song.

9. Blueberry Hill – 1956

 

Blueberry Hill is one of Fats Domino’s biggest hits. It reached number 2 on the U.S. Black Singles chart and sold over a million copies, making it number 9 on the pop chart. Although Domino had seen limited success outside of New Orleans up until that point, “Blueberry Hill” peaked at number 9 on the Billboard charts. “Blueberry Hill” was added to the National Recording Registry in 2002 as a song “culturally, historically, or aesthetically important.” It was ranked number 163 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame included it as one of “500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll”.

8. Jambalaya (On The Bayou) – 1961

 

Jambalaya (On the Bayou) is written by country music singers Hank Williams and Jimmy “C.D.” Williams. It became one of Hank Williams’ most successful singles, having been successfully covered by many artists since its first release. The song remains one of the most famous and recognizable songs in American popular music. One of Hank Williams’ most famous songs was released as the B-side to “You Win Again” in 1952. It reached number seven on the country music chart in 1953 after being released as a single.

7. Whole Lotta Lovin – 1958

 

“Whole Lotta Lovin'” is a song recorded by Fats Domino in 1958. The song spent 15 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, peaking at No. 14 while reaching No. 6 on Billboard’s R&B Singles chart and No. 6 on Canada’s CHUM Hit Parade. The Spencer Davis Group most successfully covered it in 1966. It reached No. 4 on the U.K. Singles Chart and No. 11 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, making it their first Top 40 hit. In 1995, this version was featured in a trailer for Tommy Boy starring Chris Farley.

6. I’m In Love Again – 1956

 

“I’m in Love Again” is a popular song by Dave Bartholomew and Pearl King. Fats Domino in New Orleans first recorded it on December 3, 1955. His song version went to number two on the R&B chart and #16 on the pop chart.[3] The song was initially recorded in New Orleans by Fats Domino on December 3, 1955. The song became one of his most requested songs, and Paul McCartney has acknowledged its influence.

5. I’m Gonna Be a Wheel Someday – 1957

 

Written by Dave Bartholomew, Pearl King, and Herb McSpadden, it was Domino’s first million-selling hit. The song reached number five on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1957. In 1968, Paul McCartney released a version of “I’m Gonna Be a Wheel Someday” as a single which failed to chart. “I’m Gonna Be a Wheel Someday” was released as the B-side to Fats Domino’s “Be My Guest.” The single reached number five on the Billboard Hot 100, spending eleven weeks on the chart. The song also reached number 14 on the R&B chart in 1957, becoming one of his biggest R&B hits.

4. I’m Walkin – 1957

 

“I’m Walkin'” is a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. Domino first recorded the song in 1955 on Imperial Records, taking it to the Billboard R&B chart, where it peaked at number four. In 1956, Lloyd Price recorded his version of “I’m Walkin’,” which reached number 11 on the R&B chart. Domino re-recorded “I’m Walkin'” in 1959, with Dave Bartholomew producing the session; this version was released as a single and peaked at number seven on the Billboard Hot 100, spending 15 weeks on the chart. The song also went to number two on Billboard’s R&B Singles chart.

3. I Want To Walk You Home – 1959

 

“I Want to Walk You Home” is a song by Dave Bartholomew and Pearl King. Fats Domino recorded the song in 1959, where it reached number 23 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In 1961, Bobby Bland released his version of the single, which reached number 17 on the same chart. Domino recorded “I Want To Walk You Home” on December 26, 1958, at Cosimo Matassa’s studio in New Orleans. It was released as a single in January 1959 and reached number 23 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, spending six weeks on the chart. The song also peaked at number six on Billboard’s R&B Singles chart.

2. The Fat Man – 1949

 

“The Fat Man” is a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. Domino first recorded the song in February 1949 for the Imperial Records label. Domino’s version of “The Fat Man” charted three separate times with peak positions of number eight in 1950, number 25 in 1955, and 27 in 1970. The version by Little Richard charted at number three on the R&B chart and number 21 on the pop chart in 1955, which is more successful than Fats Domino’s version of the song.

1. Ain’t That a Shame – 1955

 

“Ain’t That a Shame” is a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. Domino first recorded the song in 1955, where it reached number one on the R&B chart, staying there for ten weeks. “Ain’t That a Shame” also went to number thirteen on the pop chart. In 1956, “Ain’t That Pat Boone re-recorded a Shame.” This version reached number twelve on the pop chart and number fourteen in the U.K. Fats Domino’s original version of “Ain’t That a Shame” was produced by Dave Bartholomew and features Domino singing both lead and background vocals. The song is different from Domino’s earlier hits as it utilizes a jazz-based piano riff and a middle eight section that was not present in his previous songs.

Conclusion

As the biggest rock and roll star of the 1950s, Fats Domino released a series of million-selling singles. His achievements were not limited to music, as he helped to popularize New Orleans-style pizza after opening several restaurants in partnership with his former piano player, Dave Bartholomew.

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